Individual Notes

Note for:   Morris Dallas Bailey,   15 APR 1842 - 1876         Index

Individual Note:
     From Biographies of Tioga County Civil War Soldiers, extracted from Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen.

"Morris D. Bailey. A son of Benjamin M. and Clarissa E. (Johnson) Bailey, who have passed away, was born April 15, 1842, in Mansfield, Pa. Jennie S. Dartt whom he married at East Charleston, Tioga Co., Pa., was born at that place July 12, 1847, and passed to her reward March 17, 1885. Her father, Chauncey Dartt, is deceased, but her mother, Harriet Dartt, is still living. Three children have blessed this marriage, Ray L., Glenn R. and Emory A. Comrade Bailey was teaching in Mansfield, Pa., when he enlisted during the first year of the war at the age of 19 years at Mansfield, Pa., Aug. 24, 1861; he joined Co. F, 11th Pa. Cav., 2d Brig., Army of the James, as a private and rose to Corp. And Sergt. In 1861 he was detailed as acting Commissary Sergt. Of Regt. At Washington, D.C., and Fortress Monroe, Va., about eight months and was honorably discharged in field Nov., 1863, he re-enlisted in field in old command the same day. In Jan., 1864, he was furloughed for thirty days and returned to command at expiration of ______. In 1864-5 he was detailed at Hd. Qtrs. Of 2d Brig., Cav. Div., _____ of the James, as chief clerk of A.A.A.G., about two years; he was granted an honorable discharge from second enlistment Aug. 19, ______ at Philadelphia, Pa., A brother, George R., served in the late war, a member of Co. B, 4th Kan. V.I. Comrade Bailey was employed in county treasurer's office in Shawnee Co., Kan., in 1890-2; he left that office to accept a position in U.S. pension office at Topeka, Kan., Aug. 1, 1892, where he remained until the office changed______ one administration to another; for eight years he was Sec'y of the Soldier's and Sailors' Assn. In Kansas, consisting of over 4,000 members; he was Co. Supt. Of Pub. inst. IN Pawnee Co., Kan from ______ to 1883; he is past S.V.C. of Lincoln Post, No. 1, Topeka, Kan., is a clerk and may be addressed at 404 "B" St., N. Topeka, Kan."

From A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans by William L. Connelley, 1918

" M. D. Bailey, after coming to Kansas, was employed in the United States Land Department and subsequently for four years was county superintendent of public instruction. Before coming to Kansas he had served as a Union soldier four years. At the outbreak of the war he joined Company A of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and most of his service was in the Army of the Potomac. It was his rare privilege, while stationed in the vicinity of Hampton Roads, to witness the epoch-making naval battle between the Confederate ironclad Merrimac and the marvelous invention of Ericson, the gunboat Monitor. On account of his previous service as a soldier, M.D. Bailey, when he took up a claim in Edwards County, Kansas, had to live on it only a year to perfect his title. For many years he filled a place in the pension department, and is now in the National Hospital."


Individual Notes

Note for:   Vesta Clarissa Bailey,   16 OCT 1846 - 12 APR 1912         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Prospect Cemetery, Mansfield, PA


Individual Notes

Note for:   Jenny Lind Bailey,   17 APR 1851 - 8 MAR 1907         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Prospect Cemetery, Mansfield, PA


Individual Notes

Note for:   Ida G. Talbot,   ABT 1850 - 9 DEC 1908         Index

Burial:   
     Place:   Prospect Cemetery, Richmond Twp., Tioga, PA

Individual Note:
     From the Wellsboro Agitator.

November 22, 1893. - "Mrs. Ida Bailey and Mr. Elton Bailey of this place were married last week in Elmira. May success attend them "

October 29, 1902 - "Mrs. Elton Bailey, of Syracuse, N.Y. has returned to her home in that city after suffering a serious illness at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bailey in Elkland, where she came on a visit in September."
   

Individual Notes

Note for:   Benjamin Mart Bailey,   2 JUL 1881 - 15 APR 1945         Index

Individual Note:
     From the Wellsboro Agitator.

November 14, 1900 - ""Mr. and Mrs Elton Bailey and Mr. Mart Bailey will remove to Syracuse, N.Y. Mart expects to enter Syracuse University."

February 27, 1901 - "It is reported that Mr. B. Mart Bailey has bee appointed as Naval Cadet at Annapolis and that Wayne J. Coveny has been appointed alternate, both young gentlemen being from this county."

From the Wellsboro Gazette.

April 20, 1905 - "Honor for Mansfield Boy. The United States has conferred an honor upon Benjamin Mart Bailey. of Mansfield, who is well known in Wellsboro, having taught school in this vicinity a few years ago. Mr. Bailey was one of 40 candidates selected by examination for appointment from civil life to the army as second lieutenants. Twelve candidates were appointed. Mr. Bailey ranked first among these. He is a graduate of St. Johns Military School at Manilus, N.Y."

From the Wellsboro Agitator.

July 4, 1906 - "Last Friday Major Glenn, officer in command, at Fort Thomas, Kentucky, appointed Lieutenant Benjamin Mart Bailey, formerly of Mansfield, and well known here, as one of the officers to aid in the inspection of the 750 cadets at the Ohio State university and to act as judge."

September 26, 1906 - "Lieut. Benjamin Mart Bailey, of the 4th U.S. Infantry, stationed at Fort Thomas, Kentucky, is spending a ten days' leave of absence with Mansfield and Wellsboro relatives. His regiment has been in camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, near Lawrence, Indiana, during most of the summer."

November 7, 1906 - "Lieutenant Benjamin Mart Bailey, formerly of Mansfield, now stationed at Fort Thomas, Kentucky, has been for the past few weeks on the Licking river, near Fort Thomas, with his battalion, at target practice. Lieut. Bailey, successfully made the "marksman" and "sharp shooter" classes and was awarded a medal for so qualifying. He took first place in his battalion. AT a range of 1,000 yards, he made 44 points out of a possible 50, entitling him to first place for mark-manship in his regiment."

August 7, 1907 - "The following from the Louisville, Ky, Courier-Journal will be of interest to the numerous friends here of Lieut. B.M. Bailey, formerly of Mansfield: "So far as is known, there is only one precedent in the history of the United States army for the action of Second Lieut. Benjamin Mart Bailey, Fourth Infantry, now stationed at Ft. Thomas, Kentucky, in refusing a promotion to a first lieutenancy in the Coast artillery, although it will be four years or more before he will receive a promotion in the infantry. Lieut. Bailey preferred this branch of the service. He gives as his reason for declining; 'In view of possible hostilities in the East I prefer to be in the service at the seat of action He expects to sail with his regiment for the Philippines in March next."

During WWI Lieutenant-Colonel Benjamin Mart Bailey wrote a letter to his wife in Atlanta. describing the experience of being shelled by Hun batteries and the impressions incident to shelling the Germans in return. The letter was described as one of the brightest spotlights on actual war sensations yet received. It was originally published in the Atlanta Constitution July 14, 1918. A portion of the letter was then reprinted in the Wellsboro Gazette, July 31. 1918.

Subsequently to the shelling of the Germans, a Colonel commanding an infantry Division, French Army, called headquarters to say that B.M. Bailey's work was extremely gratifying. He went on to say that Major Bailey showed excellent judgement when communication with the infantry he was supporting had been cut, in putting down barrages where his own estimate of the situation showed they were needed. He further stated that the work of the batteries was technically of a high order. Since the letter was written, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and assigned to the 316th Field Artillery.

From the Wellsboro Agitator, January 14, 1920.

"Colonel Benjamin M. Bailey (formerly of Mansfield and well known in Wellsboro, where he has many friends), of the Atlanta Army recruiting station, is wearing two silver stars as a result of a recent general order from Washington in which he was twice cited for gallantry, once at Toulon-Thoyon and once at Chateau-Thierry, while commanding the Fifteenth Field Artillery, Second Division. Colonel Bailey returned from a short leave during which he visited in New York. He received the citations while in Washington on his way back home. --Atlanta Journal."

From the Atlanta Constitution, January 16, 1921.

"At the dinner-dance at the Piedmont Driving club last night, an enjoyable occasion, assembling a company of one hundred, Major and Mrs. Benjamin Mart Bailey entertained General W.R. Sample, who is army inspector for the southeastern states, and Mrs. Juliette Ballenger Mosely."

From the Wellsboro Agitator, November 24, 1926.

"The Atlanta Georgian says "Delightful among visitors here are the Benjamin Mart Baileys, who have come back from Major Bailey's most recent detail at Governor's Island, New York, to spend several weeks with Rosalie Davis (Mrs. Bailey's parents, the Charles A. Davises, on Peachtree street. A gratifying semblance of duration is given the visit by the placing of their young son in school here. One was impressed by the very genuine and generous compliment which 'Mart Bailey bestowed upon his lovely wife, the former belle in Atlanta society. It was to the effect that Rosalie Davis charming address and sincerity of manner were an asset to any man in whatever walk of life. Major Bailey, on the staff of General Summerall, detailed recently to Washington, is making his first visit among us for six years past. Although Rosalie has been with us meanwhile, both Major and Mrs. Bailey are receiving the most cordial welcome from their many friends. " Major Bailey was detailed to represent Major General Summerall, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, at a luncheon and reception given Queen Marie, and the following letter, written by Queen Marie, was placed in the hands of Major Bailey, to be sent to Governor Walker at Atlanta. "Georgia. The county of wonderful pines and commerce. To which we owe so much all over the world. Who has not heard of that beautiful name, Atlanta. The wonders of the new world in America as created by man, appear before our minds' eye when we think of Georgia. I am enthusiastic to know you and to tell you how I love you for what you have done in your tremendous achievements toward winning the victory to bring peace to the world."

We believe that "Queen Marie" referred to above was Queen Marie of Romania. There is a photo album featuring photographs of Queen Marie and her family from 1904 online at:

    http://speccoll.library.kent.edu/women/marie.html

From the Wellsboro Gazette.

January 22, 1925 - "In a fire which raged in a large shed on Governor's Island last week, Col. Benjamin Mart Bailey, formerly of Mansfield, lost his favorite horse, Bourbon. He was a valued Kentucky horse that Co. Bailey had ridden for several years, and one of 24 horses, valued at $20,000 lost in the fire."
   
June ?, 1925 -" Major B. Mart Bailey, U. S. A. stationed at Governor's Island as aide de camp to General Summerall was a guest of Wellsboro relatives last week."
   
April 21, 1927 - "Major B. Mart Bailey, of General McRae's staff at Governor's Island, was an over Sunday guest at the home of his cousin, Mrs. Frank Pagan."

Excerpt from an article in the Atlanta Constitution, February 13, 1921.

"Major Bailey has been stationed in Atlanta since his return to America from the war. He was cited for bravery five times, three at Chateau Thierry, one at St. Mihiel and one at Solssons. He was in command of an artillery brigade which supported the advance of the marines at Chateau Thierry when the first official entrance of American units was reported from the war zone."

Additional details about Benjamin's distinguished career are detailed in an article in the Wellsboro Agitator, June 30, 1937.

From the Wellsboro Agitator, April 18, 1945.

"Col. Benjamin Mart Bailey, aged 63 years, of Atlanta, Georgia, died Sunday at his home. He was born at Mansfield, July 2, 1881, and was graduated from the Mansfield Normal School. He served in the U.S. Army for many years and as an officer in the field artillery in the first world war and won a high position in military life. He is survived by his widow and a grandson, Benjamin Mart Bailey, III. His only son, Lt. Cpl. Benjamin Mart Bailey 2nd, was killed in actin in France Aug 24, 1943." (Should be Aug 23, 1944 as stated in the Marsh contemporary diary.)

Individual Notes

Note for:   Daphne C. Sugden,   17 APR 1883 - 3 NOV 1962         Index

Individual Note:
     From the Oakland Tribune, November7, 1962.

"EVANS, Daphne, In Oakland, November 3, 1962, loving mother of Mrs. Folger Emerson of Oakland; devoted grandmother of Mark and John Emerson of Oakland. A native of California; aged 79 years. A member of the Ladies Axillary of Col. John Jacob Astor Post No 999 VFW and 50 year member of the Oakland Chapter No 140 OES. Private services were held Monday, November 5 at Truman's Chapel Telegraph Avenue at the ??? ??? Oakland."


The CA Death Index lists Daphne's middle initial as "S", while 2 census reports and her marriage announcement say "C".

Individual Notes

Note for:   Fred A. Sugden,   1831 -          Index

Occupation:   
     Date:   1900
     Place:   RR Ticket collector

Individual Note:
     By 1929 Fred was employed as a Motorman on the Berkeley Southern Pacific Line and was one of 21 people hurt in a crash described in the Oakland Tribune, February 9, 1929. 21 people were hurt and six were reported near death after the passenger coach ramed head on into a standing switch engine attached to a freight train. The front of the steel car was demolished, commuters were thrown to the floor and it was reported that the conductor was thrown the length of the car and knocked unconscious. The paper quoted Motorman, F.A. Sugden as saying, "The tower man had the switch open and my car went onto the line of the switch engine for about three full lengths when the crash came. My train was traveling at a good rate of speed, and it all occurred so quickly I had no time to bring the train to a stop or much slower speed."

Individual Notes

Note for:   Emma Sampson,   1860 -          Index

Individual Note:
     In the 1920 CA, Alameda, Oakland census, Emma's maiden name is listed as Merrill and she is living in the household of her daughter and son-in-law.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Fred Sugden,   1874 -          Index

Occupation:   
     Date:   1929
     Place:   RR Engineer

Occupation:   
     Date:   1900
     Place:   Locomotive fireman


Individual Notes

Note for:   Folger Emerson,   4 APR 1907 - 16 DEC 1989         Index

Occupation:   
     Date:   1964
     Place:   Superior Court Judge

Occupation:   
     Date:   1956
     Place:   Assistant Prosecutor

Individual Note:
     In 1956 Folger Emerson was an assistant prosecutor. Articles in the Nevada State Journal and the Oakland Tribune detailed his involvement in two high profile murder cases.

In 1964, he was a Superior Court Judge and an article detailing his family life was published in the Oakland Tribune, August 23, 1964.

From the San Francisco Chronicle, December 19, 1898.

"Folger Emerson, who prosecuted one of the East Bay's most sensational kidnap-murder cases and later became an Alameda County Superior Court Judge, died Saturday in Walnut Creek. He was 82 and a native of Oakland. As an assistant district attorney in the mid-1950's, Mr. Emerson prepared the case against Burton J. Abbott who was convicted and later executed for kidnapping and murdering 14-year old Stephanie Bryan. The girl was from a prominent Berkeley family, and the case was front page news for months. Mr. Emerson was elected judge in 1956 and retired in 1975. Survivors include two sons, Mark and John. No services were held. The family prefers donations to the Pregnancy Center of Contra Costa County, 5047 Clayton Road, Concord 94521."

Individual Notes

Note for:   Mark Folger Emerson,   19 MAY 1939 -          Index

Education:   
     Place:   San Francisco State College

Individual Note:
     An article in the Oakland Tribune, January 26, 1970 announced the candidacy of Mark Folger Emerson for Alameda County treasurer-tax collector.

From the Oakland Tribune, June 17, 1974.

"SECOND TIME VOWS: Mark Emerson and Mrs. Beverly Cullum Gaynard were married Saturday at the Oakland home of his parents, Judge and Mrs. Folger Emerson, with Judge Emerson Officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Cullum of Oakland and has a young son, David, by her first marriage. Mark has a son, Folger Mark Emerson, by his first wife, the former Karen Kinney. Karen was remarried, in April, to Dr. Kenneth Drellich, a Walnut Creek gynecologist, and lives in Walnut Creek."